• Beekeeper John

    About the writer: John Kirk is an avid gamer, a writer, a student, and apparently likes writing in third person.

    I’m 22 summers old and a student at Rowan University, studying journalism. I’m from “South Jersey” for those who understand, New Jersey to those that don’t....Read more on the About Page....

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Looking for your new (or used) hive!

So around this time of the year is when aspiring beekeepers and those looking to expand their colonies should start looking for equipment. I’m talking hive bodies, bottom boards, and everything else that goes with them.

Now there are two different ways to go about getting a home for your girls. First you could order an entire hive from either a local supplier or an online store such as Rossman Apiaries or Better Bee.

Or you could try to do what I’m trying this season, and ask around your local beekeeping community and see if anyone is either getting rid of, or trying to sell some of their old hives off.

Just because someone is selling their hives or getting rid of old equipment doesn’t mean that it is of poor quality or a worse choice then say buying new. Usually it means that they my be getting older or are becoming busier in their lives and selling their hives to aspiring beekeepers will ensure that their hives are going to a good cause.

As with anything, when buying things from peers in your community you always want to check it for damage and ask about its history, just because you are pursuing the same hobby as they are doesn’t mean that their equipment is up to par or ever kept in great shape.

Some of the benefits are that if you get someone willing to sell you the entire hive and all its frames are: you will be getting some really valuable already drawn out comb, and they may be willing to sell to you cheaper if they learn you are a beginner beekeeper and just because you are in the certain close-knit family that beekeeping breeds. Just remember that already drawn out comb means your honeybees will have much much less work when you hive them in the early spring. This will lead them to start producing more honey and brood!

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2 Responses

  1. You can get some really good quality bee hives and other beekeeping equipment for second hand – but you need to able to inspect it make sure all is okay – Buying from some local experienced keepers is a good idea.

  2. Great point Kevin. Which is exactly why I got in contact with NJ’s state apiary inspector and he worked something out!

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